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Thursday, January 9, 2014

Finite Automata

I did some pictures of automata to go with this post, but Google have managed to bugger up 'Insert Image' in Blogger, which used to be easy.

I wonder if their monkeys are even interested in whether their filthy javascript crap actually works before they inflict it on people.

God I hate them. They've gone from 'Don't be evil / Awesome' to 'We own you now / But we can't program any more' in a couple of years.

I'd really like to move this blog somewhere less incompetent. Anyone got any suggestions?

You'll just have to imagine what the pictures look like. Think bubbles and arrows.



;; Finite Automata

;; I just did Jeff Ullmann's Stanford Course 'Automata' through Coursera. It was fascinating.

;; A finite automaton is a mathematical model representing a simple
;; computer. But it's very close to being a computer.  In fact you can
;; code them up in Verilog and make them out of silicon. In chip
;; design they're known as finite state machines.

;; They're strictly less powerful than real computers and programs,
;; but they can still do lots of stuff.  On the other hand, we can
;; determine what it is that they do much more easily than we can with
;; computers and programs.

;; Here's an example of an automaton

;; Start at A
;; A -0-> A
;; A -1-> B
;; B -1-> B
;; B -0-> A
;; B is an accepting state

;; INSERT IMAGE automaton1.png

(def automatonI {:start :A
                 :accept #{:B}
                 :transition { 1 {:A :B :B :B}
                               0 {:A :A :B :A}}})

;; How should we work out whether this automaton accepts the string 101101011 ? 

;; It starts in state :A
(automatonI :start) ;-> :A

;; The first character of the string is a 1, and so it transitions to B
(((automatonI :transition) 1) 
 (automatonI :start)) ;-> :B

;; The second character is 0, so it transitions back to :A
(((automatonI :transition) 0) 
 (((automatonI :transition) 1) 
  (automatonI :start))) ;-> :A

;; And so on
(reduce 
 (fn[state input] (((automatonI :transition) input) state)) 
 (automatonI :start) 
 (list 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1)) ;-> :B

;; The final state after all the input is consumed is :B, which is an accepting state

(defn final-state [automaton string]
  (reduce (fn[state input] 
            (((automaton :transition) input) state)) 
          (automaton :start) 
          string))


(final-state automatonI (list 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1)) ;-> :B
(final-state automatonI (list 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0)) ;-> :A

;; And so the string 101101011 is accepted by the automaton.

(defn accepts [automaton string]
  (not (nil? ((automaton :accept) 
              (final-state automaton string)))))

(accepts automatonI (list 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1)) ;-> true
(accepts automatonI (list 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0)) ;-> false

;; We might ask what other strings are accepted

;; First let's generate all possible strings of zeros and ones
(defn extend [ss] (for [a ss b '(0 1)] (cons b a)))

(extend '(())) ;-> ((0) (1))
(extend (extend '(()))) ;-> ((0 0) (1 0) (0 1) (1 1))

;; All these strings together are rather charmingly known as the free monoid on #{0,1} 
;; But enough of that! We know what strings are!

(def strings01 (apply concat (iterate extend '(()))))


strings01 ;-> (() (0) (1) (0 0) (1 0) (0 1) (1 1) (0 0 0) (1 0 0) (0 1 0) (1 1 0) (0 0 1) (1 0 1) (0 1 1) (1 1 1) (0 0 0 0) (1 0 0 0) (0 1 0 0) (1 1 0 0) (0 0 1 0) (1 0 1 0) (0 1 1 0) (1 1 1 0) (0 0 0 1) (1 0 0 1) (0 1 0 1) (1 1 0 1) ...)

;; As you may have guessed, this automaton accepts strings that end in 1

(filter (partial accepts automatonI) strings01) ;-> ((1) (0 1) (1 1) (0 0 1) (1 0 1) (0 1 1) (1 1 1) (0 0 0 1) (1 0 0 1) (0 1 0 1) (1 1 0 1) (0 0 1 1) (1 0 1 1) (0 1 1 1) (1 1 1 1) (0 0 0 0 1) (1 0 0 0 1) (0 1 0 0 1) (1 1 0 0 1) (0 0 1 0 1) (1 0 1 0 1) (0 1 1 0 1) (1 1 1 0 1) (0 0 0 1 1) (1 0 0 1 1) (0 1 0 1 1) (1 1 0 1 1) ...)

;; Proof by trying a finite number of cases:

(map last (filter (partial accepts automatonI) strings01)) ;-> (1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...)
(map last (filter (comp not (partial accepts automatonI)) strings01)) ;-> (nil 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...)

;; Here's a (slightly) more interesting variant:

;; INSERT AUTOMATONII.PNG

(def automatonII {:start :A
                  :accept #{:B}
                  :transition { 1 {:A :B :B :A}
                                0 {:A :A :B :B}}})


;; Can you see what it is doing?
(filter (partial accepts automatonII) strings01) ;-> ((1) (1 0) (0 1) (1 0 0) (0 1 0) (0 0 1) (1 1 1) (1 0 0 0) (0 1 0 0) (0 0 1 0) (1 1 1 0) (0 0 0 1) (1 1 0 1) (1 0 1 1) (0 1 1 1) (1 0 0 0 0) (0 1 0 0 0) (0 0 1 0 0) (1 1 1 0 0) (0 0 0 1 0) (1 1 0 1 0) (1 0 1 1 0) (0 1 1 1 0) (0 0 0 0 1) (1 1 0 0 1) (1 0 1 0 1) (0 1 1 0 1) ...)

;; And finally:
(def automatonIII {:start :A
                   :accept #{:A}
                   :transition { 1 {:A :B :B :A :C :C}
                                 0 {:A :A :B :C :C :B}}})

;; INSERT AUTOMATONIII.PNG

(filter (partial accepts automatonIII) strings01) ;-> (() (0) (0 0) (1 1) (0 0 0) (1 1 0) (0 1 1) (0 0 0 0) (1 1 0 0) (0 1 1 0) (1 0 0 1) (0 0 1 1) (1 1 1 1) (0 0 0 0 0) (1 1 0 0 0) (0 1 1 0 0) (1 0 0 1 0) (0 0 1 1 0) (1 1 1 1 0) (0 1 0 0 1) (1 0 1 0 1) (0 0 0 1 1) (1 1 0 1 1) (0 1 1 1 1) (0 0 0 0 0 0) (1 1 0 0 0 0) (0 1 1 0 0 0) ...)

;; Can you see what this one is doing? 

;; Here's a clue

(defn to-integer [lst]
  (cond (empty? lst) 0
        (= (first lst) 1) (+ 1 (* 2 (to-integer (rest lst))))
        :else (* 2 (to-integer (rest lst)))))

(map to-integer strings01)

(map to-integer (filter (partial accepts automatonIII) strings01)) ;-> (0 0 0 3 0 3 6 0 3 6 9 12 13 15 0 3 6 9 12 13 15 18 24 26 27 30 0 ...)

(for [[k v] (group-by (partial accepts automatonIII) (take 100 strings01))]
  [k (sort (distinct (map to-integer v)))])
;;-> ([true (0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36)] 
;;    [false (1 2 4 5 7 8 10 11 13 14 16 17 19 20 22 23 25 26 28 29 31 32 34 35)])

;; Can you get it to work the right way round? 

;; Can you generalize it?

2 comments:

  1. Re a new home for your blog I find Github/Octopress quite agreeable.

    ReplyDelete
  2. as a fellow user of google services, I feel your pain. fwiw, static blog and github pages

    ReplyDelete

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